Tag Archives: Authors Abroad

At Smallwood school, Tooting.

A group poem written by year 5 & 6 pupils from London primary schools Smallwood and Beatrix Potter on 22 March 2012

 

The Incredible Monster Inside

 

In winter dark, I see a flickering light,

an old abandoned house with cobwebby windows.

I move towards the candle flame,

slowly opened the door in the cracked brickwork,

as floorboards creak, a monster emerges from the dark!

 

First I make out a green slimy face, withered eyes, a black tongue.

It roars a loud roar and spits phlegm. Its wide mouth

has massive yellow incisors. Its mouth is purple.

I see it has green legs, black feet, brown horns.

 

It smells of burning wood and disgusting dirt.

It’s rough to the touch as it pushes past me.

It eats ten humans a day or animals when people can’t be found.

It’s eating a cat now, chomping its bones and spitting out pink gloopy mucus.

 

The monster hasn’t noticed me, so I move on into the house.

Then I discover its nest, a stinking rotten mud-bath

surrounded by a moat of dirty water. Through a window

I see a flock of baby dragons. The mother feeds them and keeps them safe.

 

I hide. The monster returns to its nest and sleeps an evil sleep.

Suddenly to a sound of blasting music, pumping beats, the hero enters.

The hero chants: ‘Look into my eyes, just look at my eyes…’
The waking monster is hypnotized, under a spell. The hero from Ancient Greece

has another slave. The world is safe once more.

 

As I creep away, I see the baby dragons have all gone to sleep

curled around their mother, free to enjoy the abandoned house in peace.

 

 

 

 

 

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Filed under Able Writers, Children's Poetry, Education, Poets in schools

Season School, another group poem by children

A Group Poem written by Able Writers from years 3 &4 on 27th March 2012 at the host school, Pudsey Lowtown, in Leeds.

Season School

In spring we make cards for Mothers’ Day, plant

lots of different flower seeds and hatch cute baby chicks.

Painting eggs in bright colours and making scenes

are fun art competitions to celebrate Easter.

In summer, the playground is our dining room.

We drink lots of water and wear sunhats and sun cream.

Playing on the field is a hot weather treat. On Sports Day

We run races amongst daisies and dandelions.

In autumn, we jump into crunchy leaves, make pictures

with their red, green, gold and brown shapes.

We make Hallowe’en cards and dance in fancy-dress discos,

watched over by bare skeleton trees.

In winter, we wear wellies, hats, scarves and gloves

to stop fingers freezing. Our breath is frosty. We enjoy

hot dinners and carol concerts, snowball fights and icy slides.

Evenings and mornings are dark but there are coloured lights.

Bare trees have diamonds on their branches.

Christmas comes and goes, spring is nearly here.

That is the wonder of our school year.

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Death Door Dave, the Turtlejack

When I lead an Able Writers’ Day for Authors Abroad, I like to write a group poem with all the pupils working on a different stanza. I take ideas from the participants and try to incorporate as many as I can, discarding the ones that don’t fit. Then each small group works on an aspect of the topic, feeds back to me, then I shape it and write it up. This teaches them structure and consistency.

This is the most recent one, written last week at Mill Lane Primary. The pupils suggested we make up our own mythical creature. I split the topic up into things like physical appearance, habitat, diet, behaviour and so on. THis is what they came up with in half an hour!

 

 

Death Door Dave, The Turtlejack

His head is a barking jackal with orange eyes.
The wet-noser has a turtle body,
a creature with wire wings and green blood;
wolverine-clawed, its scorpion tail is green-flamed.

Invivible he can be, or camouflaged,
breathing fire, water or air. If he knows
you are coming he lies in wait.
He can fly high or low, scary in the sky.

You cannot hear him come, you cannot hear him go,
you cannot hear him run from all the things he fears.
He may look like a blood-thirsty savage
but his heart is a baby’s touch.
Diaphonous smoke curls around him
with a reek of gloom and loneliness.

At night he steals dinosaur eggs, seasons them with fairy dust,
eats with a salad of brussel heads, lettuce and carrots.
By day he kidnaps humans to make friends
and wonders why he fears them.

Death Door Dave used to be a happiness thief
a life crusher, a human eater, a dream disintegrator.
That was before pest control put him in prison.
Now he’s a changed monster, vegetarian, wise.

He was first created in a meteorite accident,
the only one of his kind. Now he lives in
a groovy flat, a moose-head on the wall.
candles lit, a massive double bed, waiting for a mate.

Written by the group on Able Writers’ Day at Mill Lane Primary School, Thame, Oxford

 

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Filed under Able Writers, Children's Poetry, Education, Salt, The New Generation