Gladstone’s Library

The applications for next year’s Writers in Residence programme at Gladstone’s Library have just opened. I do urge people to apply. The library wants to help writers at all stages of their career and from all walks of life. The application process is fairly simple. You can find the guidelines here: https://www.gladstoneslibrary.org/events/writers-in-residence/submission-guidelines

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Amy Sumner has been asking former writers in residence to summarise their feelings about their residencies, and here is mine. If I’d had more space (brevity was important as it had to fit on my book cover) I would have added that being a Gladstone writer is a lifelong experience. I’ve attended workshops by other poets either side of my own residency, and been back to use the library. I’ve been invited back to read at both Gladfest and Hearth, to my great joy, and have enjoyed a few short breaks there besides. The library itself is a real proper old-fashioned library where there is silence so profound, one can hear the books whispering in their different languages. The bedrooms are cosy and all have desks, so work can happen at any time. While you can have peace and solitude in the library and your room, you can find company in the dining room or the Gladstone room, with its squashy leather sofas and a big square table with the daily papers. When I was in residence, I used to take my post-lunch pot of tea in there and read the papers before heading back to the library. For fresh air, there are plenty of nice walks locally, and a rather lovely church next door with some famous stained glass windows. The village of Hawarden is small but pleasant and has all you need including several pubs.

If you want to read more about how I spend my time there, you can find my three blog posts, as well as ones by other, here: https://www.gladstoneslibrary.org/news/volumes/glad-be-gladstones-angela-topping

https://www.gladstoneslibrary.org/news/volumes/what-libraries-mean-me

I got loads done when I was there. Problems I was stuck on melted away as my focus improved. I wrote some new poems as well as completing my book on John Clare, and edited three pamphlet anthologies I’d been putting off doing. I gave individual written feedback to the writing group that meets there. I led a whole day workshop, and did an evening reading as well as an evening talk. The combination of interfacing with the public and having silent time really worked for me.

Seriously, apply. You won’t regret it.

 

 

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